More Trophy Goodness

Rose bowl edge detail ©2015 WTEK
Rose bowl edge detail ©2015 WTEK

While I won’t showcase the finished piece before the tournament next Sunday, you can still get an idea of how it looks from these in process shots.

Before forming any of the pieces, I added the little dot details along the edges of all the petals. Then the bowl portion was formed into a bowl shape. Then I formed the base and made sure the two fit together.

Once again, base in your face ©2015 WTEK
Once again, base in your face ©2015 WTEK

This took a little finagling and then they needed to be joined via rivets. The strange thing about making this trophy is that instead of finishing all the pieces and then drilling and riveting everything at the end, I had to rivet each layer as I went. Otherwise I wouldn’t have been able to get the hammer where I needed it to go.

Starting to look like a trophy... ©2015 WTEK
Starting to look like a trophy… ©2015 WTEK

Next came the forming of the nickel pieces to match the bowl. I formed each piece, drilled, and riveted it, then moved on to the next one. Once all of these pieces were together, I was then able to do the final designing of the outer petals and then make and rivet them on. Take my word for it, it came out spot on to how I protoyped it. Obviously the metal actuality is a little different than the paper, but it worked!!!

Three nickel petals on ©2015 WTEK
Three nickel petals on ©2015 WTEK
Two tiers of petals done! ©2015 WTEK
Two tiers of petals done! ©2015 WTEK
Two of the brass outer petals on (with two more paper petals holding placement) ©2015 WTEK
Two of the brass outer petals on (with two more paper petals holding placement) ©2015 WTEK

From Paper to Metal and a little Krull too

It reminded me too much of the Glaive not to pass up these cheesy homage ©2015 WTEK
It reminded me too much of the Glaive not to pass up this cheesy homage ©2015 WTEK

I whet your appetite with the paper designs for the commissioned trophy, but now I’ve got some in process shots for you too.

I textured and folded two sheets of brass for the base and the main bowl portion, then I air chased the sheet destined to be the bowl.

The base all cut-out and pretty ©2015 WTEK
The base all cut-out and pretty ©2015 WTEK

Yeah, like “there was told a day would come when the 24g sheet of brass would be air chased before being joined with its one true love, the 22g brass base…” They were meant to be together since the dawn of time, hehe. But I digress.

Air chased cone of brass ©2015 WTEK
Air chased cone of brass ©2015 WTEK

After unfolding everything flat, I went ahead and drew on the patterns and cut, filed, and sanded them. Next I moved onto the nickel pieces. These were textured, folded, and pierced as well. And see how I took the edge from the bowl “petals” to draw the edge of the nickel “petals”? That’s to bring the whole design together.

The petals of nickel ©2015 WTEK
The petals of nickel ©2015 WTEK

I can’t wait to get back in the studio to start forming these pieces up. Then I get to rivet them, and by rivet I mean there will be around 36 rivets in this piece. But you know me, that’s the way I form.

PS: Can you tell I had too many Starbursts today?

See the pattern of the nickel piece next to the brass petal? ©2015 WTEK
See the pattern of the nickel piece next to the brass petal? ©2015 WTEK
I couldn't resist putting an actual rose next to the bowl parts. They will not be going together this way BTW ©2015 WTEK
I couldn’t resist putting an actual rose next to the bowl parts. They will not be going together this way BTW ©2015 WTEK

You Can’t Foldform Nickel!

From start to finish, the process of forging folded nickel ©2015 WTEK
From start to finish, the process of forging folded nickel ©2015 WTEK

I was actually told this by a metalsmith – you can’t foldform nickel! As you can see by looking through my process posts that it is possible. It’s just a lot of work. Nickel is a springy metal (thus why it is used in actual springs) which makes it difficult to work with and keep it from warping.

But I love the color, the durability that nickel provides, so I foldform nickel. Not just little line folds either. OK, this is technically a line fold, but then I forge the edges to get it to curve. This is the same technique I used on the copper parts in Ixis. Didn’t take quite as much annealing for that one though…

Copper, now copper moves like butter, but where’s the challenge in that?

As for the rest of the chalice, that’s coming along nicely too. I’m working out right now how to finish up the base and then once it’s all together I’ll post the rest of the in process photos. You’ll see the challenge isn’t just in using nickel!